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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the second half of the show. first, the man president obama nominated to run the c.i.a., counter-terrorism adviser john brennan spent quality time with the senate intelligence committee today as they considered his qualifications to become our nation's top spy. he faced tough questions from senators on both sides of the aisle. on the c.i.a.'s enhanced interrogation techniques aka torture, accusations he leaked secret information to reporters and his direction of the not so covert drone war against alleged terrorists. now, before brennan could say much, the hearing was interrupted by code pink peace protestors had a lot to say about the drone war themselves. >> they want you to tell congress what countries we are killing children. >> john: based on what we heard today congress might not be interested in knowing that information. intelligence committee chairwoman dianne feinstein said despite reports drones have killed hundreds of civilians -- >> the figures we've obtained from the executive branch which we have done our utmost to verify confirm that the number of civilian casualti
for is the one who is up this week. on thursday of this week, president obama's nominee to head the cia, john brennan, will face the senate intelligence committee for his confirmation hearing as the director of central intelligence. one of the very first thing president obama did you might remember when he first became president at the start of his first term in 2009 was that he dropped the bush administration's torture policy. remember, he did that right away. he issued an executive order two davis taking office to doubly, triply extra ban torture in the united states. at the start of that first term, newly elected president obama also wanted to nominate john brennan to be the head of the cia. but he didn't end up putting him forward. john brennan ended up taking his name out of contention for that nomination because of opposition to him being chosen. and the opposition centered on the fact that john brennan had been deputy executive director of the cia during the bush days. during the bad old torturing prisoners days of the george w. bush administration. so you're going to have a brand-new
to be the next head of the cia. and andrea mitchell, i wonder if this could, in any way, get in the way of brennan again. >> well, this is so much in a state of flux right now. clearly, i mean, the president's called to senator wyden last night, so unusual to try to reassure him and try to ward off what could be a calamitous hearing today. the fact is that brennan was already going to be asked about enhanced interrogation techniques. john mccain has raised those issues. but in terms of the democratic group and actually susan collins was one of those as well, the 11 senators led by john wyden and three of them are on the committee including wyden and susan collins, and they were pushing for the release of this. and then mike rogers on our air yesterday, the house intelligence chair not in the confirmation process, but he lent his voice. senator feinstein was obviously working behind the scenes. and so finally last night around 6:30, 7:00 last night, the white house relented and the president called wyden. i know you guys are going to talk to wyden later. but this is a very big deal becau
for the job -- brennan and his suitability for the job of c.i.a. director. mr. speaker, may i commend to my colleagues on both sides of capitol hill recording -- capitol hill regarding this issue and to the american people a powerful new documentary that examines in part some of the issues i have discussed today and their grave implications for our national security, public safety and freedoms. this documentary, called the grand deception, is a product of counterterrorism expert steven emerson's investigative project on terrorism. and it provides critical insights into the true nature of the, quote, global jihadist threat. including its expanding successes overseas and the danger it poses here at home. it chronicles the history of what i believe has been an officially sanked and willful blindness to that threat. it also lays bare the various ways in which such a practice is contributing to the emboldinning of our enemies, the undermining of our allies the steady erosion of our economy and our security. mr. speaker, let me close by noting as the previous gentleman did that today is ronald re
adviser, and the director of the cia that there were weapons of mass destruction in iraq. so for a lot of the decisions that were made at the outset, they were decisions that were informed with incorrect information. as the committee is judging senator hagel on that decision, i want to tell the committee what was the experience of this senator. what i would like to do with my time here is that since there are few of us in this room that served in the military during the vietnam era, and you clearly have that experience in combat. senator hagel -- by the way, a lot of people don't know anything about vietnam and don't know how difficult it was as senator warner has so eloquently stated in his comments, how the nation was divided. what i would like for you as the committee is getting to know you, know something about your service in vietnam and your combat experience. were you wounded, senator hagel? >> senator nelson, thank you. if i may, if i read into your question, some latitude in answering. i would respond this way -- i think my time is better served may be talking about these spec
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)